THE CLUELESS THAT CALL SPORTS RADIO

While listening to WFAN Sports Radio in New York, a caller stated that Otani would have blown away Adujar if he was not hurt.  Dear misguided caller, Otani was injured and did not put up the stats you stated.  If

Image result for nick johnson baseball yankees  Nick Johnson were not so injury prone, he could have been inducted to Cooperstown.  If I had

Image result for bird flying gifs  wings, I would fly.  If I were 6 foot 6, I could have been
Image result for dave debusschere  Dave Debusschere.  Need I go on and on?  EDB
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THANK YOU AGAIN GEEK WRITERS

Image result for major league baseball writers association  Once again, the Baseball Writers have shown how clueless they are.  They voted for A.L. Rookie of The Year.

A TRIBUTE TO WILLIE “STRETCH” McCOVEY

Willie McCovey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Willie McCovey
Willie McCovey 2012.jpg

Image result for willie mccovey GIFS

Image result for willie mccovey GIFS

Image result for willie mccovey GIFS
McCovey at the 2012 Giants World Series parade
First baseman
Born: (1938-01-10)January 10, 1938
Mobile, Alabama
Died: October 31, 2018(2018-10-31) (aged 80)
Stanford, California
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
July 30, 1959, for the San Francisco Giants
Last MLB appearance
July 6, 1980, for the San Francisco Giants
MLB statistics
Batting average .270
Hits 2,211
Home runs 521
Runs batted in 1,555
Teams
Career highlights and awards
Member of the National
Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Baseball Hall of Fame Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg
Induction 1986
Vote 81.4% (first ballot)

Willie Lee McCovey (January 10, 1938 – October 31, 2018), nicknamed “Mac“, “Big Mac“, and “Stretch“, was an American professional baseball first baseman. He played for the San Francisco Giants of Major League Baseball for 19 seasons, and three more in MLB for the San Diego Padres and Oakland Athletics, between 1959 and 1980. He batted and threw left-handed and was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1986.

One of the most intimidating power hitters of his era, McCovey was called “the scariest hitter in baseball” by pitcher Bob Gibson, an assessment with which Reggie Jackson concurred.[1] McCovey’s powerful swing generated 521 home runs, 231 of which he hit in Candlestick Park, the most hit there by any player, and included a home run of September 16, 1966 described as the longest ever hit in that stadium.[2]

Early life[edit]

McCovey was born in Mobile, Alabama. He was the seventh child of ten born to Frank and Esther McCovey.[3] He began working parttime at the age of 12 and dropped out of high school without graduating in order to work fulltime.[4]

Professional career[edit]

Prior to playing for the San Francisco Giants, McCovey played for a Giants’ farm club in Dallas, Texas that was part of the Class AA Southern League. In that league, he did not participate when his team played in Shreveport, Louisiana due to segregation in that city. He later played for the Pacific Coast League Phoenix Giants just prior to joining the San Francisco Giants.[5]

San Francisco Giants (1959–73)[edit]

In his Major League debut on July 30, 1959, McCovey went four-for-four against Hall-of-Famer Robin Roberts of the Philadelphia Phillies, batting 4-for-4 with two singles and two triples. In 52 major league games, he had a .354 batting average and 13 home runs. He was named the National League‘s (NL) Rookie of the Year.[3] He won the NL Player of the Month Award in August, his first full month in the majors (.373, 8 HR, 22 RBI). He had a 22-game hitting streak, setting the mark for San Francisco Giants rookies, four short of the all-time team record.[6]

Three years later, he helped the Giants to the 1962 World Series against the New York Yankees. Perhaps McCovey’s best-known moment in baseball came in the bottom of the 9th of Game 7, with 2 outs and the Giants trailing 1–0. With Willie Mays on second base and Matty Alou on third, any base hit would likely have won the championship for the Giants. McCovey scorched a hard line drive that was snared by the Yankees’ second baseman Bobby Richardson, ending the series with a Yankees’ win. That would turn out to be the closest McCovey would get to playing on a World Series Championship team.[7]

McCovey spent many years at the heart of the Giants’ batting order along with fellow Hall-of-Famer Willie Mays. His best year statistically was 1969 when he hit 45 home runs, had 126 RBI and batted .320 to become the National League MVP. He won NL Player of the Month awards in July 1963 (.310, 13 HR, 27 RBI) and August 1969 (.315, 8, 22 RBI). He and Hank Aaron tied for the NL lead with 44 home runs.[3]

In the early years of Candlestick Park, the Giants home stadium, the area behind right field was open except for three small bleacher sections. When McCovey came to bat, typically those bleachers would empty as the fans positioned themselves on the flat ground hoping to catch a McCovey home run ball – anticipating the gathering of boats in McCovey Cove, a generation later, when Barry Bonds would bat.[8]

San Diego Padres and Oakland Athletics (1974–76)[edit]

Willie McCovey attempts to tag Cincinnati Reds‘ shortstop Dave Concepción out at first base at McCovey’s last game at Candlestick Park

On October 23, 1973, the Giants traded McCovey and Bernie Williams to the San Diego Padres for Mike Caldwell. The Giants had been trading their higher-priced players and gave McCovey input into his destination.[4] McCovey played in 128 games in 1974 and 122 games in 1975. He hit 22 home runs in 1974 and 23 in 1975.[9]

In 1976, McCovey struggled, and lost the starting first base job to Mike Ivie. He batted .203 with seven home runs in 71 games. Near the end of the season, the Oakland Athletics purchased his contract from the Padres. He played in eleven games for them.[4][9]

Return to San Francisco (1977–80)[edit]

McCovey returned to the Giants in 1977 without a guaranteed contract, but he earned a position on the team.[4] With Hank Aaron and Frank Robinson having retired at the end of the 1976 season with 755 and 586 home runs respectively, McCovey began 1977 as the active home run leader with 465. That year, during a June 27 game against the Cincinnati Reds, he became the first player to hit two home runs in one inning twice in his career (the first was on April 12, 1973), a feat since accomplished by only Andre Dawson and Jeff King. One was a grand slam and he became the first National Leaguer to hit seventeen. At age 39, he had 28 home runs and 86 RBIs and was named the Comeback Player of the Year.[10]

On June 30, 1978, at Atlanta‘s Fulton County Stadium, McCovey hit his 500th home run, and two years later, on May 3, 1980, at Montreal‘s Olympic Stadium, McCovey hit his 521st and last home run, off Scott Sanderson of the Montreal Expos. This home run gave McCovey the distinction, along with Ted Williams (with whom he was tied in home runs), Rickey Henderson, and Omar Vizquel of homering in four different decades: the 1950s, 60s, 70s, and 80s. McCovey is one of only 29 players in baseball history to date to have appeared in Major League baseball games in four decades.[11]

In his 22-year career, McCovey batted .270, with 521 home runs and 1,555 RBIs, 1,229 runs scored, 2,211 hits, 353 doubles, 46 triples, a .374 on-base percentage and a .515 slugging percentage. He also hit 18 grand slam home runs in his career, a National League record.[12]

Legacy[edit]

SFGiants 44.png
Willie McCovey’s number 44 was retired by the San Francisco Giants in 1980.

McCovey Cove and the arcade at AT&T Park

McCovey was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986. It was his first year of eligibility and he appeared on 346 of 425 ballots cast (81.4 percent). In 1999, he ranked 56th on The Sporting News list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players,[13] and was nominated as a finalist for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. Since 1980, the Giants have awarded the Willie Mac Award to honor his spirit and leadership. The inlet of San Francisco Bay beyond the right field fence of AT&T Park, historically known as China Basin, has been redubbed McCovey Cove in his honor. Across McCovey Cove from the park a statue of McCovey was erected and the land on which it stands named McCovey Point. The Giants retired his uniform number 44 on September 21, 1980, which he wore in honor of Hank Aaron, a fellow Mobile, Alabama native.[14][15]

McCovey was inducted to the Afro Sports Hall of Fame, February 7, 2009 in Oakland, California. The Willie McCovey field at Woodside Elementary School was recently rededicated in 2013.[5] He was the namesake for the “McCovey Chronicles”, the Giants’ sports news site on SB Nation.[16]

Post-playing career[edit]

McCovey was a senior advisor with the Giants for 18 years. In his role, he visited the team during spring training and during the season, providing advice and other services.[17]

In September 2003, McCovey and a business partner opened McCovey’s Restaurant, a baseball-themed sports bar and restaurant, located in Walnut Creek, California. The restaurant closed in February 2015.[18]

Personal life[edit]

He was married to Karen McCovey and had a daughter. On August 1, 2018, McCovey married Estela Bejar at AT&T Park.[19]

In 1996, McCovey and Duke Snider pled guilty to federal tax fraud charges. According to the charges, they had failed to report income from sports card shows and memorabilia sales from 1988 to 1990.[20][21][22] He received a pardon from President Barack Obama on January 17, 2017.[23][24]

Death[edit]

McCovey died at the age of 80 at Stanford University Medical Center on October 31, 2018, following hospitalization for an infection.[25]

Standard Batting

Year
Age Tm
1959 21 SFG
1960 22 SFG
1961 23 SFG
1962 24 SFG
1963 25 SFG
1964 26 SFG
1965 27 SFG
1966 28 SFG
1967 29 SFG
1968 30 SFG
1969 31 SFG
1970 32 SFG
1971 33 SFG
1972 34 SFG
1973 35 SFG
1974 36 SDP
1975 37 SDP
1976 38 TOT
1976 38 SDP
1976 38 OAK
1977 39 SFG
1978 40 SFG
1979 41 SFG
1980 42 SFG
22 Yrs
162 Game Avg.
|
SFG (19 yrs)
SDP (3 yrs)
OAK (1 yr)
|
NL (22 yrs)
AL (1 yr)
Standard Batting
Year
Age Tm Lg G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS OPS+ TB GDP HBP SH SF IBB Pos Awards
1959 21 SFG NL 52 219 192 32 68 9 5 13 38 2 0 22 35 .354 .429 .656 1.085 188 126 7 4 0 1 1 3 MVP-22,RoY-1
1960 22 SFG NL 101 307 260 37 62 15 3 13 51 1 1 45 53 .238 .349 .469 .818 128 122 3 0 0 2 4 3
1961 23 SFG NL 106 374 328 59 89 12 3 18 50 1 2 37 60 .271 .350 .491 .841 125 161 8 5 0 4 3 3
1962 24 SFG NL 91 262 229 41 67 6 1 20 54 3 3 29 35 .293 .368 .590 .957 154 135 6 0 0 3 1 739
1963 25 SFG NL 152 627 564 103 158 19 5 44 102 1 1 50 119 .280 .350 .566 .915 161 319 10 11 1 1 5 *73/9 AS,MVP-17
1964 26 SFG NL 130 434 364 55 80 14 1 18 54 2 1 61 73 .220 .336 .412 .748 108 150 9 5 0 4 5 73/9
1965 27 SFG NL 160 639 540 93 149 17 4 39 92 0 4 88 118 .276 .381 .539 .920 153 291 8 6 2 3 5 *3 MVP-10
1966 28 SFG NL 150 588 502 85 148 26 6 36 96 2 1 76 100 .295 .391 .586 .977 163 294 8 6 0 4 10 *3 AS,MVP-17
1967 29 SFG NL 135 539 456 73 126 17 4 31 91 3 3 71 110 .276 .378 .535 .913 159 244 8 6 2 4 17 *3 MVP-29
1968 30 SFG NL 148 608 523 81 153 16 4 36 105 4 2 72 71 .293 .378 .545 .923 174 285 10 5 0 8 20 *3 AS,MVP-3
1969 31 SFG NL 149 623 491 101 157 26 2 45 126 0 0 121 66 .320 .453 .656 1.108 209 322 11 4 0 7 45 *3 AS,MVP-1
1970 32 SFG NL 152 638 495 98 143 39 2 39 126 0 0 137 75 .289 .444 .612 1.056 182 303 13 3 0 3 40 *3 AS,MVP-9
1971 33 SFG NL 105 402 329 45 91 13 0 18 70 0 2 64 57 .277 .396 .480 .876 149 158 6 4 0 5 21 3 AS,MVP-15
1972 34 SFG NL 81 304 263 30 56 8 0 14 35 0 0 38 45 .213 .316 .403 .719 102 106 3 2 0 1 5 3
1973 35 SFG NL 130 495 383 52 102 14 3 29 75 1 0 105 78 .266 .420 .546 .966 162 209 6 1 0 6 25 *3
1974 36 SDP NL 128 443 344 53 87 19 1 22 63 1 0 96 76 .253 .416 .506 .922 164 174 8 1 0 1 9 3
1975 37 SDP NL 122 475 413 43 104 17 0 23 68 1 0 57 80 .252 .345 .460 .805 129 190 10 3 0 2 8 *3
1976 38 TOT MLB 82 251 226 20 46 9 0 7 36 0 0 24 43 .204 .283 .336 .619 82 76 4 1 0 0 8 3/D
1976 38 SDP NL 71 224 202 20 41 9 0 7 36 0 0 21 39 .203 .281 .351 .633 86 71 4 1 0 0 7 3
1976 38 OAK AL 11 27 24 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 4 .208 .296 .208 .505 54 5 0 0 0 0 1 /D
1977 39 SFG NL 141 548 478 54 134 21 0 28 86 3 0 67 106 .280 .367 .500 .867 132 239 16 0 0 3 16 *3 MVP-20
1978 40 SFG NL 108 390 351 32 80 19 2 12 64 1 0 36 57 .228 .298 .396 .694 97 139 12 0 0 2 8 3
1979 41 SFG NL 117 394 353 34 88 9 0 15 57 0 2 36 70 .249 .318 .402 .720 102 142 7 1 0 3 2 3
1980 42 SFG NL 48 132 113 8 23 8 0 1 16 0 0 13 23 .204 .285 .301 .586 66 34 3 1 0 3 2 3
22 Yrs 2588 9692 8197 1229 2211 353 46 521 1555 26 22 1345 1550 .270 .374 .515 .889 147 4219 176 69 5 70 260
162 Game Avg. 162 607 513 77 138 22 3 33 97 2 1 84 97 .270 .374 .515 .889 147 264 11 4 0 4 16

 

HAND DEALT TO INDIANS FOR MEJIA

The Cleveland Indians have acquired Brad Hand from The Padres for Francisco Mejia.  Mejia 22, spent the 2018 season at Triple A has batted .279 with 7 Hrs and 45 RBIs.  The Indians in the deal also get Adam Climber.  Climber 27 in his first season in the bigs.  Climber 3.17 E.R.A. and 51 strikeouts in 48 1/3 innings.  Hand, on the other hand, bad pun EDB, at 28 years old has 24 saves with a 3.05 E.R.A. for the Padres (no pressure there, EDB.)  He has struck out 64 in 44 1/3 innings.  Answer this question EDB, with the great

Image result for chasen shreve  Chasen Shreve, why didn’t the Yankees land Hand?  He would have bolstered an already strong bullpen and given the Yankees a lefty option top Shere.  Very simple….Hand signed a three year $19.75 three year extension. in 2018.  The Yankees must stay under the 189 million to reset their salary cap.  It is believed the Yankees have 17 million to play with.  EDB

A TRIBUTE TO BASEBALL ENTERTAINER..MYRON NOODLEMAN

NICK JOPHNSON WELCOMES NEW MEMBER

Image result for nick johnson injury photos President Nick Johnson welcome the newest member to his Baseball Injury Club…It is no other than