Lake Bell (UPDATE)

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Lake Bell

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Lake Bell
Bell at the Montclair Film Festival, May 2015

Lake Bell at the 2011 Tribeca Film Festival premiere of A Good Old Fashioned Orgy
Born Lake Siegel Bell
(1979-03-24) March 24, 1979 (age 37)
New York City, New York, U.S.
Occupation Actress, director, screenwriter
Years active 2001–present
Spouse(s) Scott Campbell (m. 2013)
Children 1

Lake Siegel Bell[1] (born March 24, 1979)[2] is an American actress, director, and screenwriter.

She has starred in the television series Boston Legal (2004–06), Surface (2005–06), How to Make It in America (2010–11) and Childrens Hospital (2008–2016) and in the films Over Her Dead Body (2008), What Happens in Vegas (2008), It’s Complicated (2009), No Strings Attached (2011) Million Dollar Arm (2014), Man Up (2015) and The Secret Life of Pets (2016).

She wrote and directed the short film Worst Enemy, which debuted at the Sundance Film Festival in 2012, followed by her 2013 feature film directing debut In a World…, in which she also starred.

Early life[edit]

Bell was born in New York City. Her mother, Robin Bell, owns the design firm Robin Bell Design in New York.[3][4] Her father is real estate developer Harvey Siegel, who bought the then-closed Virginia International Raceway and converted it into a racetrack country club, and who owned New Jersey Motorsports Park.[5]

Bell’s father is Jewish and her mother is Protestant. Bell has stated that she was raised in a “comically dysfunctional” family.[6][7]

Bell attended The Chapin School in New York and Westminster School in Simsbury, Connecticut. For part of her teenage years she lived in Vero Beach, Florida and attended Saint Edwards School.[8] She attended Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, New York, before transferring to Rose Bruford College in London.[9][10] There she acted in theatrical productions including The Seagull, The Children’s Hour, Six Degrees of Separation, Light Shining in Buckinghamshire and The Pentecost.[11]

Career[edit]

Actress[edit]

Bell began her career in 2002 with roles in the film Speakeasy, a film about two men who become unlikely friends after a minor traffic accident, and in 2 episodes of the medical TV drama ER. Her first significant roles came in 2003. After appearing in the psychological thriller I Love Your Work, she was cast alongside Jeff Goldblum as the female lead in the NBC television film War Stories and played Alicia Silverstone‘s wisecracking best friend, Victoria Carlson, in NBC’s comedy-drama series Miss Match. In 2004, Bell appeared in the wrestling film Slammed and made her debut as Sally Heep in the final four episodes of The Practice. Her character was carried over into the spinoff Boston Legal, where she was a regular cast member until she left the series in 2005.

Bell then played the lead role in the science fiction series Surface, which aired between September 2005 and May 2006. 2006 also saw her star in the film Rampage: The Hillside Strangler Murders about the Hillside Strangler of the late 1970s and return to Boston Legal for two episodes, reprising her role as Sally Heep, opposing counsel to Alan Shore (portrayed by James Spader). In 2008, she played the female lead in the thriller Under Still Waters, for which she won the Newport Beach Film Festival Award for Outstanding Performance in Acting,[12] starred alongside Paul Rudd and Eva Longoria in the romantic comedy Over Her Dead Body, played Cameron Diaz‘s character’s best friend in the romantic comedy What Happens in Vegas and played the wife of Colin Farrell‘s character in crime drama Pride and Glory.

She was also cast as the lead female role, Dr. Cat Black, in Rob Corddry‘s satirical comedy Childrens Hospital.[13] The fourth season began airing in August 2012 and featured two episodes that were directed by Bell—the season premiere, “The Boy with the Pancakes Tattoo”, a parody of The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo and the ninth episode, “A Kid Walks in to a Hospital”.[14]

Bell in June 2009

In 2009, Bell voiced the role of Dana Mercer in the video game Prototype, played Alec Baldwin‘s wife in the romantic comedy It’s Complicated and guest starred in an episode of the fourth season of the series Wainy Days. 2010 saw Bell voice a supporting role in Shrek Forever After, star in the satirical film Burning Palms, guest star in an episode of the second season of the sitcom The League and cast as a lead character in the HBO series How to Make It in America,[12] which aired for two seasons from February 2010 to November 2011. Bell was to play Deputy Judy Hicks in Scream 4, but dropped out four days before filming due to scheduling conflicts, with the role going to Marley Shelton.[15]

In 2011, Bell starred alongside Josh Lucas and Terrence Howard in the supernatural thriller Little Murder, played Ashton Kutcher‘s boss in the romantic comedy No Strings Attached, a performance that won her critical praise and was called “scene-stealing,”[16] starred in the ensemble comedy A Good Old Fashioned Orgy and guest starred in an episode of the first season of Zooey Deschanel‘s sitcom New Girl. Bell had a lead role alongside Kate Bosworth in the 2012 thriller Black Rock.[17]

Writer and director[edit]

In 2010, Bell made her writing and directing début with the short film Worst Enemy, which starred Michaela Watkins, Matt Walsh and Lindsay Sloane. Her film débuted at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival[18] and has also played at the Nantucket Film Festival, the Dallas International Film Festival, the Gen Art Film Festival and Aspen Shortsfest, winning the Tony Cox Award for Screenwriting in a Short Film from Nantucket and receiving a Shorts Jury Special Mention from Dallas. Her film led to her being named one of the “2012 Inspiring Filmmakers” by LUNAFEST.[19]

Bell made her writing and directing feature film debut at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival with In A World….[20][21] which she wrote and directed and in which she starred[16] She describes the film as “a comedy about a female voice-over artist and family dysfunction and relationships. I’m obsessed with the voice-over world, so it makes sense for me.”[16][22][23] The film was picked up by Roadside Attractions and Sony.[24]

In February 2014 she said her next project would be What’s the Point? (And Other Fair Questions About Marriage), a film she will write and direct.[25][26]

Modeling[edit]

Bell in July 2011

Bell was 45th on Femme Fatales’ list of the 50 Sexiest Women of 2003; came 6th on British Vogue‘s list of the 10 Best Dressed Women of 2007, was 32nd on Maxim’s Hot 100 of 2008, was 44th on Maxim’s Hot 100 of 2012 and 89th on AskMen‘s 99 Most Desirable Women of 2012. In 2007, Bell appeared in a photo shoot for GQ;[6] in 2008 she appeared in a photo shoot for Marie Claire;[27] in 2009 she modeled for Scott Caan, for his first book, Scott Caan Photographs, Vol. 1;[28] and in 2011 she appeared in photo shoots for Elle,[29] Los Angeles,[30] Maxim[31] and Esquire,[32] the latter in conjunction with the website Me In My Place.[33] In September 2011, Bell modeled at Pirelli‘s Fashion Week in Milan, Italy.[34][35] For New York Fashion Week 2013, Bell modeled nude with strategic body painting (done by her husband) on the cover of New York shot by Mark Seliger.[36] In April 2014, Bell appeared in Esquire for the second time.[37]

Other activities[edit]

Bell has an automotive column in The Hollywood Reporter called Test Drive and is the magazine’s automotive contributing editor.[38]

Personal life[edit]

Bell and Colin Farrell, her co-star in Pride and Glory, dated for a time.[6]

In 2011, Bell began dating Scott Campbell, an artist and tattoo artist. The two met when he played himself in an episode of the second season of How to Make It in America. The couple became engaged on Bell’s birthday in March 2012[39] and were married on June 1, 2013 at The Marigny Opera House in New Orleans, Louisiana.[40] In late October 2014, her representative confirmed that Bell had given birth to their daughter, Nova.[41] The two are currently expecting their second child.[42]

Filmography[edit]

Film[edit]

Films
Year Title Role Notes
2002 Speakeasy Sara Marnikov
2003 War Stories Nora Stone
I Love Your Work Felicia
2004 Fresh out of Tears Leila Short film
Slammed Gina Micelli
2006 Rampage: The Hillside Strangler Murders Jillian Dunne
2008 Under Still Waters Charlie Newport Beach Film Festival Award for Outstanding Performance in Acting
Over Her Dead Body Ashley
What Happens in Vegas Tipper
Pride and Glory Megan Egan
Prop 8: The Musical Scary Catholic School Girls From Hell Short for Funny or Die
2009 It’s Complicated Agness Adler National Board of Review Award for Best Acting by an Ensemble
2010 Shrek Forever After Patrol Witch / Wagon Witch #2 (voice)
Burning Palms Mary Jane
The Doctors of Children’s Hospital Answer Your Medical Questions Dr. Cat Black Short for Funny or Die
10 Minutes Herself Short for Funny or Die
Worst Enemy Writer and director
Short film
Tony Cox Award for Screenwriting in a Short Film, Nantucket Film Festival
Shorts Jury Special Mention, Dallas International Film Festival
2011 Little Murder Corey Little Distributed in US in 2017 as “Ghost of New Orleans”
No Strings Attached Lucy
A Good Old Fashioned Orgy Alison Cohen
Home for Actresses Lake Short for Funny or Die
2012 Black Rock Lou
2013 In a World… Carol Solomon Also writer, director, and producer
Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award, Sundance Film Festival 2013
2014 Mr. Peabody & Sherman Mona Lisa (voice)
Million Dollar Arm Brenda Paauwe Bernstein
2015 Man Up Nancy Patterson
No Escape[43] Annie Dwyer
2016 The Secret Life of Pets Chloe (voice)
2017 Shot Caller In post-production
Home Again In post-production

Television[edit]

Television
Year Title Role Notes
2002 ER Jody Holmes Episode: “One Can Only Hope
Episode: “Tell Me Where It Hurts
2003 Miss Match Victoria Carlson Series regular
2004 The Practice Sally Heep Episode: “The Firm
Episode: “Comings And Goings
Episode: “New Hoods on the Block
Episode: “Adjourned (a.k.a. Cheers)
2004–2006 Boston Legal Sally Heep Series regular; guest star
2005–2006 Surface Laura Daughtery Series regular
2008–2016 Childrens Hospital Dr. Cat Black Series regular
2009 Wainy Days Blaire Episode: “Dance Club”
2010 The League Brooke Episode: “The White Knuckler
2010–2011 How to Make It in America Rachel Chapman Series regular
2011 New Girl Amanda Episode: “Naked
2012 Top Gear U.S. Herself Episode: “Rut’s Show
2012 Tron: Uprising Lux (voice) Episode: “Identity”
2012 Robot Chicken Black Widow / Ariel (voice) Episode: “Collateral Damage in Gang Turf War”
2013 Newsreaders Dixie Peters Episode: “Hair Razing”
2015 Axe Cop Axe Girl (voice) Episode: “Ultimate Mate”
2015 BoJack Horseman Katrina Peanutbutter (voice) Episode: “Hank After Dark”
2015 Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp Donna 7 episodes
2016 Cassius & Clay Shopcarter Clay (voice)
2017 Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later Donna

Video games[edit]

Video games
Year Title Role Notes
2009 Prototype Dana Mercer

Joy Suprano

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Joy Suprano

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Joy Suprano is an American actress best known for her roles in the films We Are The Hartmans and A Little Help.

Early life[edit]

Suprano was born and raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and graduated from Burrell High School where she was a competitive athlete and a member of the drama club. She moved to New York City just days after high school graduation to pursue her acting career. After a couple of years of performing in New York City and throughout the country she attended and then graduated from The Juilliard School, New York City where she studied acting.

Career[edit]

Since graduation from The Juilliard School, she has had numerous recurring, guest star, and series regular roles in television, including Law & Order, Law & Order: SVU, HBO‘s How to Make It in America, Royal Pains, 100 Questions and Law & Order: CI. She was cast in leading roles in the films We Are The Hartmans and A Little Help.

Currently, Suprano plays the recurring role, Christen, on season two of HBO’s How to Make It in America and recently finished production of the HBO pilot 40 starring Ed ward Burns. She voiced Anita Mendoza in Grand Theft Auto V.

Suprano also serves as the (singing) hostess of the national finals of the National American Miss pageant.

FILMOLOGY:

2017 THE BLACKLIST (TV SERIES) FEMALE MC

2015 ROYAL PAINS (TV SERIES) CAROLINE KOCH

2013 GRAND THEFT AUTO V (GAME ANITA MENDOZA

2013 LONELY BOY MICHELE

2013 EVA (SHORT) ELISE

2012 40 MARGOT

2010-11 HOW TO MAKE IT IN AMERICA (CHRISTEN

2011 LAW AND ORDER: CRIMINAL INTENT (TV SERIES) ILANA GARVEY

2010 A LITTLE HELP JULIE  CANTONI

2009 LAW AND ORDER: SPECIAL VICTIMS UNIT (TV SERIES) RITA

2009 LAW AND ORDER (TV SERIES) PORIA

 

 

 

 

 

Melora Hardin

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Melora Hardin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Melora Hardin
Melora Hardin LF.jpg

Hardin at the premiere of 27 Dresses, January 2008
Born (1967-06-29) June 29, 1967 (age 49)
Houston, Texas, U.S.
Alma mater Sarah Lawrence College
Occupation Actress, singer
Years active 1977–present
Spouse(s) Gildart Jackson (m. 1997)
Children 2
Website www.melora.com

Melora Diane Hardin (born June 29, 1967) is an American actress and singer, known for her roles as Jan Levinson on NBC’s The Office and Trudy Monk on USA’s Monk. More recently, Hardin appeared in a recurring role on Amazon’s critically acclaimed series Transparent, for which she was nominated for an Emmy.

Early life[edit]

Hardin was born in Houston, Texas, the daughter of acting manager/coach and retired actress Diane (née Hill) and actor Jerry Hardin.[1] She is the sister of Flock CEO Shawn Hardin. She was raised in San Francisco, California, after her family moved there when she was 4 years old. She went to middle school in the San Fernando Valley at Patrick Henry Junior High.[2] She graduated from Sarah Lawrence College.

Career[edit]

1977–1999[edit]

Hardin started her acting career as the young star of the television series Thunder (1977–1978), and has appeared in over 70 movies and television programs since, including two 1981 Little House on the Prairie episodes (as Belinda Stevens in “The Reincarnation of Nellie”, Parts 1 and 2) as well as playing Michele Pierson in the 1983 television movie Little House: Look Back to Yesterday. She starred as Baby in the short-lived 1988 television series Dirty Dancing (based on the 1987 film of the same name) and two 1992 episodes of Quantum Leap (as Abigail in “Trilogy,” Parts 2 and 3). She co-starred in the 1990 dance movie Lambada as Sandy. She appeared in Absolute Power (1997) as Christy Sullivan and played Ross‘s dirty talking love interest in the season 1 Friends episode “The One with the Stoned Guy”. She was also originally cast in Back to the Future as Jennifer Parker, but was re-cast after Eric Stoltz (the original Marty McFly) was let go. Upon Michael J. Fox being cast, Hardin was deemed too tall to star alongside him. She was later replaced by Claudia Wells.[3][4]

2000–present[edit]

Hardin starred in the 2000–2001 series Cover Me: Based on the True Life of an FBI Family, and 2004-2009 she played the recurring role of Trudy Monk, the title character’s deceased wife, on the USA Network series Monk. She appeared on the series NCIS as former Petty Officer Erin Toner in the episode “The Curse”.[5] In 2005, Hardin portrayed Linda Evans in Dynasty: The Making of a Guilty Pleasure, a fictionalized television movie based on the creation and behind the scenes production of the 1980s prime time soap opera Dynasty.[6][7] Hardin played former corporate manager Jan Levinson in The Office from 2005 to 2013.

Hardin later appeared in the 2006 film Thank You for Smoking, and appears in Hannah Montana: The Movie as Robby Ray‘s (Billy Ray Cyrus‘) love interest. The film premiered on April 10, 2009.[8] She played the role of Fantine in the Hollywood Bowl‘s concert of Les Misérables in Summer 2008.[9] Hardin appeared in several episodes of the popular web show, Elevator, on YouTube.

Hardin made her Broadway debut as Roxie Hart in the revival of Chicago: The Musical on December 29, 2008. She stayed with the show until February 12, 2009.[10] Hardin was cast as a major character in Outlaw, playing a powerful senior partner of an elite law firm, and the main love interest to the series’ protagonist, played by Jimmy Smits.[11] Hardin played the role of Isabelle Palmer‘s mother Nancy in An American Girl: Isabelle Dances Into the Spotlight (2014).

Singing career[edit]

Hardin played a nightclub singer in Disney’s The Rocketeer (1991), where she can be heard singing “Begin the Beguine“. She also played a major role in the TV movie Tower of Terror, where she sings “Boy of My Dreams”.[citation needed]

Hardin sang the National Anthem at the season opening hockey games of the Anaheim Ducks on October 13, 2010,[12] and the Phoenix Coyotes on October 16, 2010.[13] She sang the Star Spangled Banner at the Dover International Speedway for the AAA 400 on October 2, 2011. Hardin sang the song “Tiers of Joy” (composed by Austin Wintory) for the Leisure Suit Larry: Reloaded soundtrack.[citation needed]

Filmography[edit]

Film
Year Film Role Notes
1979 North Avenue Irregulars, TheThe North Avenue Irregulars Carmel
1985 Papa Was a Preacher Janette
1986 Iron Eagle Katie
1986 Soul Man Whitney Dunbar
1989 Big Man on Campus Cathy
1989 Jeweler’s Shop, TheThe Jeweler’s Shop Monica
1990 Lambada Sandy Thomas
1991 The Rocketeer South Seas singer
1993 Reckless Kelly Robin Banks
1994 Pornographer, TheThe Pornographer Sasha Leon Hoffner
1995 Chameleon Jill Hallman
1996 Undercover Kid, TheThe Undercover Kid Clyde
1997 Absolute Power Christy Sullivan
1997 Tower of Terror Carolyn Crosson
1998 Erasable You Calamity
1999 Seven Girlfriends Laura
2000 Certain Guys Mary Beth
2002 Hot Chick, TheThe Hot Chick Carol
2004 El padrino Jane
2007 Drive Thru Marcia Carpenter
2007 Dukes, TheThe Dukes Diane
2007 Boxboarders! Ruth Keene
2007 The Comebacks Barb Fields
2007 Violin, TheThe Violin Gertrude Bloch Short film
2008 27 Dresses Maureen
2009 17 Again Principal Jane Masterson
2009 Hannah Montana: The Movie Lorelai
2009 You Miranda Also director and producer
2010 Knucklehead Mary
2011 I Melt with You Jane
2012 Zombie Hamlet Pam
2012 Beauty and the Least: The Misadventures of Ben Banks Mary Andrews
2012 Taking the Edge Off Short film
2014 An American Girl: Isabelle Dances Into the Spotlight Nancy Palmer
2015 Self/less Judy O’Neill
Television
Year Title Role Notes
1976 Police Story Sheila Episodes: “The Jar: Parts 1 & 2”
1977 Thunder Cindy Prescott Main role (12 episodes)
1977 Cliffwood Avenue Kids, TheThe Cliffwood Avenue Kids Melora TV series
1978 Love Boat, TheThe Love Boat Courtney Chenault 1 episode
1979 Quincy, M.E. Amanda Episode: “Never a Child”
1980 Diff’rent Strokes Emily Morehouse Episode: “Skin Deep or True Blue”
1980 ABC Afterschool Special Amy Warner Episode: “What Are Friends For?”
1980 Haywire Brooke Hayward, age 11 TV film
1980–1981 Secrets of Midland Heights Micki Carroll Regular role (10 episodes)
1981 Little House on the Prairie Belinda Stevens Episodes: “The Reincarnation of Nellie: Parts 1 & 2”
1982 Quincy, M.E. Abigail “Abby” Garvin Episode: “Next Stop, Nowhere”
1983 Family Tree, TheThe Family Tree Tess Benjamin TV series
1983 Magnum, P.I. Nancy Perkins Gillis Episode: “Luther Gillis: File #521”
1984 Mama Malone Kathleen Episode: “The Education of Frankie”
1985 Best Times, TheThe Best Times Joy Villafranco Regular role (6 episodes)
1986 Hotel Beth Episode: “Heroes”
1988–1989 Dirty Dancing Frances “Baby” Kellerman Main role (11 episodes)
1989 Tour of Duty Christine Pierson Episodes: “Sins of the Father”, “Sealed with a Kiss”
1990 Shangri-La Plaza Amy TV film
1991 Equal Justice Doris Walsh Episode: “Who Speaks for the Children?”
1992 Miles from Nowhere Teresa TV film
1992 Mann & Machine Louise Trotsky Episode: “Torch Song”
1992 Quantum Leap Abigail Fuller Episodes: “For Your Love”, “The Last Door”
1993 Moon Over Miami Emily Booker Episode: “My Old Flame”
1994 Murder, She Wrote Cindy Warrick Episode: “Roadkill”
1994 Golden Gate Susan Carlino TV film
1994 Renegade Laura McMillan Episode: “Carrick O’Quinn”
1994 Matlock Lisa Swift Episode: “The Scandal”
1994 Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman Molly Flynn Episode: “Operation Blackout”
1995 Friends Celia Episode: “The One with the Stoned Guy”
1995 Touched by an Angel Lizbeth Episode: “The Big Bang”
1995 Diagnosis: Murder Savannah Bellows Episode: “The New Healers”
1996 Renegade Kelly Anderson Episode: “Paradise Lost”
1996 Caroline in the City Beth Episode: “Caroline and the Bridesmaids”
1997 Things That Go Bump Chloe Garrett TV film
1997 Orleans Gina Vitelli Episodes: “Luther’s Temptation”, “When the Saints Go Marching In”
1997 Tower of Terror Claire Poulet TV film
1997 Tom Show, TheThe Tom Show Lorraine Episode: “Tom’s First Date”
1998 Tom Show, TheThe Tom Show Lorraine Episode: “The Centerfold”
1998 Timecop Edith Thomas Episode: “Lost Voyage”
1998 Pretender, TheThe Pretender Wendy Dawson Episode: “Homefront”
1999 Payne Danielle Harris Episode: “Gossip Checks In and a Cat Checks Out”
1999 Diagnosis: Murder Melanie Cooper Episode: “Trash TV: Part 1”
2000–2001 Cover Me Barbara Arno Main role (24 episodes)
2001 Once and Again Samantha Aldrich Episode: “Moving On”
2002 Family Guy Patsy Ramsey (voice) Episode: “Brian Wallows and Peter’s Swallows
2002 Judging Amy Rosalie Leavitt Episode: “Roses and Truth”
2003 Division, TheThe Division Cheryl Lynn Brinkmeyer Episode: “Rush to Judgment”
2003 NCIS Former Petty Officer Erin Toner Episode: “The Curse”
2004 Hollywood Mom’s Mystery, TheThe Hollywood Mom’s Mystery Summer Rossner TV film
2004 Boston Legal Sharon Brant Episode: “Head Cases”
2004–2009 Monk Trudy Monk Recurring role (10 episodes)
2005 Dynasty: The Making of a Guilty Pleasure Linda Evans TV film
2005–2013 Office, TheThe Office Jan Levinson Regular role; 46 episodes
2006 Without a Trace Pamela Seaver Episode: “Rage”
2006 Gilmore Girls Carolyn Bates Episode: “Partings”
2006 Office: The Accountants, TheThe Office: The Accountants Jan Levinson-Gould Episode: “The Books Don’t Balance”
2008 Mom, Dad and Her Emma TV film
2008 Yo Gabba Gabba! Herself Episode: “Birthday”
2010 Outlaw Claire Sax Recurring role (4 episodes)
2011 CSI: Miami Wendy Colton Episode: “G.O.”
2012–2013 Wedding Band Roxie Rutherford Main role (10 episodes)
2013 Scandal Shelley Meyers Episode: “Say Hello to My Little Friend
2014 Killer Women Nan Reed Episode: “Some Men Need Killing”
2014 Do It Yourself Kaye TV film, post-production
2014–2015 Transparent Tammy Recurring role (13 episodes)Nominated—Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series (2016)
2015 Falling Skies Captain Katie Marshall Episodes: “Everybody Has Their Reasons”, “Stalag 14th Virginia”
2017 The Blacklist Isabella Stone Episode: “Isabella Stone”

Geraldine Hughes

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Geraldine Hughes

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Geraldine Hughes
GeraldineHughesMar09.jpg

Geraldine Hughes in New York City in March 2009
Born 1970 (age 46–47)
Belfast, Northern Ireland
Nationality Irish
Education University of California, Los Angeles[1]
Occupation Actress
Years active 1984–present
Net worth $500,000 (2015)[2]
Height 5 ft 3 in (1.60 m)

Geraldine Hughes (born 1970) is an Irish actress. Born in West Belfast, Hughes has appeared in films such as Duplex, Rocky Balboa and Gran Torino.[1][3] She also played Mary Todd Lincoln in Killing Lincoln.[4] More recently, she performed a solo play written by herself, Belfast Blues.

Early life[edit]

Hughes grew up in the Divis Flasts in Belfast, Northern Ireland, during The Troubles. To get herself through the tough times, Hughes participated in her school’s drama club. She loved school, saying it made her feel safe and she enjoyed the structure it provided. It was where she escaped from The Troubles.[5] After being chosen for her role in the film Children of the Crossfire, Hughes spent her first summer in the United States. She had no acting experience beyond her school’s drama club before accepting her role as Mary in the movie.[6]

Family and Personal Life[edit]

Hughes comes from a working-class family in Belfast, Ireland. She grew up in a Catholic household. Because she lived during The Troubles, Hughes experienced life in a war zone. Belfast Blues is a play she wrote detailing her real life experiences from her life in Belfast. As a child, Hughes never spoke of the horrors she witnessed in Belfast.[6] Her performances of this play are dedicated “to all the children who live in places of conflict.”[7] Hughes left Belfast at the age of 18. She lived in Los Angeles for 16 years then moved to New York City.[8] Family comes first for Hughes as she regularly returns to Belfast for visits.[9]

Hughes married an American from Pennsylvania, Ian Harrington. He also “came from nothin” as his family was very poor. He was the first to encourage Hughes to share her story.[6]

Education[edit]

In Belfast, Hughes attended St. Louise Comprehensive School in the ’80s. Later, she attended the University of California in Los Angeles (UCLA) with a private scholarship from those she worked with in the film Children of the Crossfire. While they paid her tuition, she paid her living expenses.[6] Hughes graduated from the university with a BA from the School of Theater, Film and TV. And in 2009, Queens University in Belfast awarded Hughes an honorary doctorate for her contributions to the performing arts.[10]

Career[edit]

When Hughes was just 14, American TV producers auditioned hundreds of children in Ireland for their film and of the hundreds, three were chosen to participate in the film, Hughes being one of them. This first film debut of hers was in the movie, Children of the Crossfire in the year 1984. Later, during her first years in Los Angeles, Hughes became a part-time nanny Danny DeVito and Rhea Perlman‘s children.[6]

After a theater performance of hers, Hughes was contacted by a casting director and asked to audition for the role of Marie in Rocky Balboa, a role she is arguably most known for.[9]

Hughes has been and continues to work in the field of performing arts.

Filmography[11] and Theatrical Appearances[edit]

Film[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1984 Children of the Crossfire Mary
1997 St. Patrick’s Day Maeve
1986 The End of the World Man Barbara
2003 Duplex Receptionist
2006 Rocky Balboa Marie
2008 Gran Torino Karen Kowalski
2009 Pumpgirl Sinead
2012 Dead Souls Mary Petrie
2013 Killing Lincoln Mary Todd Lincoln
2014 Time Out of Mind Marie
2017 The Book of Henry Mrs. Evans

Television[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1998 ER. Susan McFarlan
2003 Murder She Wrote Fiona Byrne
2007 Law & Order SVU Tina Parven
2008 Law & Order Sandra Talbot
2010 Nurse Jackie Molly Gaherty
2010 Mercy Tammy Singer
2010 The Good Wife Rachel Knox
2010 Law and Order CI Regina
2013 Blue Bloods Meara McGuire
2013-2014 The Blacklist Dr. Nina TV Series, 2 episodes

Theater[12][edit]

Year Title Role Notes
Jerusalem Westend and Broadway productions
Particle of Dread
Cyrano De Bergerac Broadway
Translations Bridget Broadway
Molly Sweeney
Orson’s Shadow
The Cripple Inishmaan
The Architect
Belfast Blues 24 characters a solo play written by Hughes-based off real life events

Awards and Nominations[edit]

Hughes received her first award in 2003, the Los Angeles Ovation Award.[13] Just a year later, in 2004 she received the Garland and Drama Critics Circle Awards.[14] Hughes also received a nomination for Distinguished Performance from the Drama League Award for her acting in her solo play, Belfast Blues, in 2004.[15]

JACKIE SANDERS

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FILMOLOGY:

2017 THE BLACKLIST (TV SERIES) CORINA SANTOS

2016 A PINCH OF SALT (SHORT)

2015 HUNTING SEASON (TV SERIES)

2014 SHE LIGHTS UP WELL RUDE CASTING DIRECTOR

2013 CLUB MAGIC MOMENT (SHORT) DONNA

2013 AISSA’S  STORY (SHORT) VOICE OF LINDA MORALES

2013 SCREAMING IN ASIAN (SHORT)

2012 LISPENARD (SHORT) CONSTANCE

2011 PAN AM (TV SERIES) PASSNEGR

2003 MONA LISA SMILE BAND ANNOUNCER

1994 QUEENS (TV SERIES) ANNOUNCER

THEATER

2016 TAMING OF THE SCHREW

2016 REMEMBER ME

2016 MEASURE FOR MEASURE

2016 KICKING A DEAD HORSE

 

 

Elizabeth Lail

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Elizabeth Lail

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Elizabeth Lail
Elizabeth Lail on the sets of Once Upon A Time.jpg

On the set of Once Upon A Time in 2014
Born Elizabeth Dean Lail
(1992-03-25) March 25, 1992 (age 24)
Williamson County, Texas, U.S.
Occupation Actress
Years active 2011–present

Elizabeth Dean Lail[1] (born March 25, 1992[2][better source needed]) is an American actress. She is known for her role as Anna in the ABC adventure fantasy television series Once Upon a Time.

Early life[edit]

Lail was born in Williamson County, Texas,[2] to her parents, Dean Franklin Lail and wife Kay Lurene Surratt, a distant cousin of John Surratt.[3][4][better source needed] She has one older sister.[4][5] They moved to Asheboro, North Carolina, from where her ancestors hailed.[6][7][better source needed]

After graduating from Asheboro High School,[8] Elizabeth began studying acting at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts in 2010, and finished school in May 2014.[citation needed]

Career[edit]

Lail mostly worked in student film productions, such as Model Airplane and Without, immediately after graduating from university.[citation needed] She had moved to New York City to pursue stage work when she landed an audition for ABC’s Once Upon a Time, after which she was cast as Anna in the fourth season of the series.[9] Lail was cast in a starring role in the Freeform horror series Dead of Summer playing the role of camp counselor Amy.[10]

Filmography[edit]

Television and film roles
Year Title Role Notes
2011 Model Airplane Anna Short film; as Elizabeth Dean Lail
2014 Without Emily Short film; as Elizabeth Dean Lail
2014 Once Upon a Time Anna Recurring role (season 4), 10 episodes
2016 Dead of Summer Amy Hughes Main role
2017 The Blacklist Natalie Luca Episode: “Natalie Luca

Gina Bellman

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Gina Bellman

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Gina Bellman
Born (1966-07-10) 10 July 1966 (age 50)
Auckland, New Zealand
Occupation Actress
Years active 1984–present
Children 1

Gina Bellman (born 10 July 1966) is a New Zealand-born British Jewish actress best known for her performances as Jane Christie on the BBC’s hit comedy show Coupling and as grifter Sophie Devereaux on the 2008 TNT television series Leverage.

Early life[edit]

Bellman was born in New Zealand to Jewish parents of Russian and Polish origin[1] who emigrated to New Zealand from England in the 1950s. Her family returned to the United Kingdom when she was 11 years old.[1] She attended JFS in London.[citation needed]

Career[edit]

After making her debut in an episode of Into the Labyrinth in 1982, and a two-episode stint in Grange Hill in 1984, she became a household name for her performance in the title role in Dennis Potter‘s drama Blackeyes. She is also well known for playing Jane in the sitcom Coupling. Her other TV roles include Waking the Dead, Jonathan Creek, Little Napoleons, and one-off appearances in Only Fools and Horses and Hotel Babylon.

She has also appeared in several feature films including King David (1985), which starred Richard Gere and Edward Woodward, Secret Friends (1991), Leon the Pig Farmer (1992), and Silent Trigger (1996) opposite Dolph Lundgren.

She co-starred alongside James Nesbitt in the 2007 BBC One drama serial Jekyll, a modern-day sequel to Robert Louis Stevenson’s Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, written by Coupling author Steven Moffat.[2]

In 2008, she began appearing on the TNT channel‘s serial drama Leverage, starring Timothy Hutton, for which she was nominated for a Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actress in Television, but lost to fellow New Zealand alumna Lucy Lawless.[3][4]

In 2013, Bellman narrated poetry for The Love Book App, an interactive anthology of love literature developed by Allie Byrne Esiri.[5] In late 2013, she played the role of “The Italian Woman” in the National Theatre‘s production of the Georg Kaiser play From Morning to Midnight.[6]

In 2015, Bellman appeared as Vivien Leigh in the European premiere of the Austin Pendleton play Orson’s Shadow, at the Southwark Playhouse in London.[7]

Personal life[edit]

In July 2005, she married Lucho Brieva. The marriage lasted a year and they divorced in 2007. In 2009, she had a daughter, Romy. In 2013, she married the father, Zaab Sethna, whom she met just after shooting the Leverage pilot.[citation needed]

Filmography[edit]

Film
Year Film Role Other notes
1985 King David Tamar
Mussolini: The Untold Story Gina Ruberti (television mini-series)
1991 Secret Friends Helen
1992 Vsetko co mam rad Ann
Leon the Pig Farmer Lisa
1993 Horse Opera Sandra/Marion
1996 Silent Trigger Clegg (Spotter)
1997 David Michal (television film)
2000 Ted & Ralph Henrietta Spain
Paranoid Eve
Seven Days to Live Claudia
2001 Subterrain Junkie Spirit
Married/Unmarried Amanda
2003 Sitting Ducks Christine
2005 Zerophilia Sydney
2007 Permanent Vacation Kathleen Bury
 2016  THE HAVE-NOTS LEILA
Television
Year Title Role Notes
1982 Into the Labyrinth Christine Episode: Phantom
1984 Grange Hill Trudy Episode: 7.8
Episode: 7.9
1989 Only Fools and Horses Carmen Episode: The Unlucky Winner Is…
1989 Screen Two Greta Episode: Sitting Targets
1989 Blackeyes Blackeyes Episode 1.1
Episode 1.2
Episode 1.3
Episode 1.4
1991 The Storyteller Eurydice Episode: Orpheus and Eurydice (live-action puppet television series)
1994 Little Napoleons Liz Blakemore Episode: The Big Interview
1996 Scene Athene Nike/Trainer Episode: Young Jung
1996 Sharman Kiki Episode 1.1
1999 Jonathan Creek Samantha Episode: Ghost’s Forge
2000–2004 Coupling Jane Christie 28 episodes
2003 Waking the Dead Frannie Henning Episode: Final Cut: Part 1
Episode: Final Cut: Part 2
2005 The Last Detective Caroline Episode: Friends Reunited
2007 Hotel Babylon Marina Stoll Episode: 2.2 (BBC television drama)
2007 Jekyll Claire Jackman Episode: 1.1
Episode: 1.2
Episode: 1.3
Episode: 1.4
Episode: 1.5
Episode: Hyde
2007 Nearly Famous Traci Reed Episode: 1.1
Episode: 1.2
Episode: 1.4
2007 Heroes and Villains Catherine Carteaux Episode: Napoleon (television docudrama)
2008 The Wrong Door Pilot Instructor/Jill Episode: Njarnia
Episode: The Smutty Aliens
2008–2012 Leverage Sophie Devereaux 72 episodes
2013 Ripper Street Jemima Swann Series 2, episode 6
 

2017  EMERALD CITY  KAREN

Theatre
Year Title Role Notes
1990 The Rocky Horror Show Janet Weiss Piccadilly Theatre
2000 Speed-the-Plow Karen Duke of York’s Theatre
2013 From Morning to Midnight Italian Lady/Salvation Army Officer National Theatre
2015 Orson’s Shadow Vivien Leigh Southwark Playhouse

Andrea Navedo

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Andrea Navedo

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Andrea Navedo
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Navedo at the 2014 Alma Awards
Born (1977-10-10) October 10, 1977 (age 39)
Bronx, New York City, U.S.
Occupation Actress
Years active 1995–present
Children 2

Andrea Navedo is an American actress. She began her career on the daytime soap operas One Life to Live (1995–97) and Guiding Light (1999-2000), and in later years had several supporting roles on primetime television. In 2014, Navedo began starring as Xiomara “Xo” Villanueva in The CW comedy-drama series, Jane the Virgin.[1]

Early life[edit]

Navedo was born in the Bronx.[2] A second-generation New York Puerto Rican, she grew up in New York City.[3] She said she relates to her Jane the Virgin character because her mother was also a young single mother.[4] Navedo graduated from DeWitt Clinton High School in 1988 and graduated from the State University of New York at Old Westbury in 1998 with a BA in Communicative and Creative Arts and a concentration of Theater.[2]

Career[edit]

Navedo began her professional acting career on the daytime soap operas. From 1995 to 1997, she played the role of Linda Soto in the ABC soap opera, One Life to Live. In 1999, she joined the cast of CBS soap opera Guiding Light as Theresa Sandoval.[2] She made her film debut with small part in Girl 6 (1996), and later guest starred in episodes of New York Undercover and The District. In 2001, Navedo co-starred in the action comedy film, Double Take.

From 2001 to 2004, Navedo had a recurring role on the NBC legal crime series, Law & Order, as Detective Ana Cordova. later guest-starred on Law & Order: Criminal Intent, Damages and Blue Bloods. Navedo also has appeared in the number of films such as Washington Heights, El Cantante and Remember Me. From 2011 to 2013, Navedo also had the recurring roles on How to Make It in America, Golden Boy and Law & Order: Special Victims Unit. She starred in the comedy film Superfast!, the parody of The Fast and the Furious film series.[5]

In 2014, Navedo was cast in the series regular role of Xiomara “Xo” Villanueva, title character’s mother (played by Gina Rodriguez) in The CW critically acclaimed comedy-drama series, Jane the Virgin.[6][7] She received the 2015 Imagen Award for Best Supporting Actress – Television for her performance.[8][9]

Personal life[edit]

Navedo has been married since 2000 and has a daughter (Ava) and a son (Nico).[10][11]

Filmography[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1995-1997 One Life to Live Linda Soto Series regular
1996 Girl 6 Phone Girl
1997 New York Undercover Clerk Episode: “Is It a Crime?”
1999-2000 Guiding Light Theresa Sandoval Series regular
2000 The District Debbie Episode: “Pilot”
2001 Double Take Maque Sanchez
2002 Washington Heights Maggie
Porn ‘n Chicken Lucy Sanchez Television film
2001-2004 Law & Order Detective Ana Cordova Recurring role, 24 episodes
2006 El Cantante Zaida
2008 Law & Order: Criminal Intent Adele Episode: “Vanishing Act”
2009 Damages Gabriella Episode: “New York Sucks”
2010 Remember Me Caroline’s Teacher
2010-2011 Blue Bloods Lydia Gonsalves & Yolanda Gonsalves Episodes: “After Hours[12] and “Cellar Boy[13]
2011 How to Make It in America Debbie Dominguez Recurring role, 7 episodes
2012 White Collar Doctor Episode: “Most Wanted”
2013 Golden Boy Lorraine Arroyo Recurring role, 4 episodes
Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Cynthia Mancheno Recurring role, 3 episodes
Last I Heard Anna Vasco
Stereotypically Me Lydia Maldonado Short film
2014–present Jane the Virgin Xiomara “Xo” Villanueva Series regular
Imagen Award for Best Supporting Actress – Television (2015)
2015 Superfast! Michelle
2017 Bright Captain Perez In post-production

Afton Williamson

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Afton Williamson

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Afton Williamson
Born Afton C. Williamson
1985 (age 31–32)
Toledo, Ohio, US
Nationality American
Alma mater Eastern Michigan University (A.B.)
Alabama Shakespeare Festival (M.A.)
Occupation Actress
Years active 2010–present
Website Afton Williamson

Afton Williamson (born 1985) is an American actress who had recurring roles on A Gifted Man as Autumn and the first season of the television series Nashville as Makena, as well as starring on the Cinemax network original series Banshee.

Early life and education[edit]

Williamson was born in Toledo, Ohio. She earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Eastern Michigan University and a Master of Fine Arts degree from the Alabama Shakespeare Festival.[1]

Career[edit]

Williamson started as the understudy to Kerry Washington in the Broadway play Race before succeeding Washington in the role of Susan.[2] In 2012 she had a recurring role as Makena on the television series Nashville.

Filmography[edit]

Film
Year Film Role Notes
2011 Pariah Mika
2012 Man on a Ledge Janice Ackerman
Abducted: The Carlina White Story Cassandra
Television
Year Title Role Notes
2010 Da Brick Rachel Pilot
The Good Wife Yarissa Morgan Episode: “Bad Girls”
2011 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Isabelle Wright Episode: “Reparations”
Homeland Helen Walker 3 episodes: “Pilot“, “The Good Soldier, and “Achilles Heel” (credited as Afton C. Williamson)
2011–2012 A Gifted Man Autumn 9 episodes
2012 Blue Bloods Officer Perez Episode: “No Questions Asked”
Royal Pains Heather Small Episode: “Business & Pleasure”
Nashville Makena 3 episodes: “We Live in Two Different Worlds”, “Move It on Over”, and “You’re Gonna Change (Or I’m Gonna Leave)”
2013–2015 The Following Haley Mercury / Kate 2 episodes: “Whips & Regret” and “Exposed”
2014–2015 Banshee Alison Medding 14 episodes
2015 Elementary Shauna Scott Episode: “The Best Way Out Is Always Through”
2016 The Night Of Officer Wiggins 5 episode
2015-2016 Blindspot Kara Sloane 2 episodes

2017 THE BLACKLIST LULU

2017 2017 FINDING HER TIFFANY WATSON

Kirsten Dunst (UPDATED)

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Kirsten Dunst

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Kirsten Dunst
Kirsten Dunst Cannes 2016.jpg

Kirsten Dunst at the 2016 Cannes Film Festival
Born Kirsten Caroline Dunst
(1982-04-30) April 30, 1982 (age 34)
Point Pleasant, New Jersey, U.S.
Citizenship United States
Germany
Occupation Actress
Years active 1988–present
Partner(s) Jesse Plemons (e. 2017)

Kirsten Caroline Dunst (/ˈkɪərstən/; born April 30, 1982) is an American actress. She made her film debut in Woody Allen‘s short film Oedipus Wrecks for the anthology film New York Stories (1989). At the age of twelve, Dunst gained widespread recognition as Claudia in Interview with the Vampire (1994), a role for which she was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress. She appeared in Little Women the same year and in Jumanji the following year. After a recurring role in the NBC medical drama ER (1996–97) as Charlie Chemingo and starring in films such as Wag the Dog (1997), Small Soldiers (1998), the English dub of Kiki’s Delivery Service (1998), and The Virgin Suicides (1999), Dunst began making romantic comedies and comedy-dramas, starring in Drop Dead Gorgeous (1999), Bring It On (2000), Get Over It and Crazy/Beautiful (both released in 2001).

Dunst achieved fame for her portrayal of Mary Jane Watson in Sam Raimi‘s Spider-Man trilogy (2002–07). Since then, her films have included the romantic comedy Wimbledon (2004), the science fiction romantic comedy-drama Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004) and Cameron Crowe‘s romantic tragicomedy Elizabethtown (2005). She played the title role in Sofia Coppola‘s biographical film Marie Antoinette (2006) and starred in the comedy film How to Lose Friends & Alienate People (2008). She won the Best Actress Award at the Cannes Film Festival and the Saturn Award for Best Actress for her performance in Lars von Trier‘s Melancholia (2011). She starred in the second season of the television series Fargo in 2015, playing the role of Peggy Blumquist, a slightly delusional and neurotic hairdresser. Her performance garnered widespread critical acclaim, leading to her winning the Critics’ Choice Television Award for Best Actress and being nominated for the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress and the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series or Movie.

In 2001, Dunst made her singing debut in the film Get Over It, in which she performed two songs. She also sang the jazz song “After You’ve Gone” for the end credits of the film The Cat’s Meow (2001).

Early life[edit]

Dunst was born in Point Pleasant, New Jersey, to Klaus Hermann Dunst and Inez Dunst. She has a younger brother, Christian.[1] Her father worked as a medical services executive, and her mother worked for Lufthansa as a flight attendant[2][3] and was an artist and one-time gallery owner.[4] Dunst’s father is German, originally from Hamburg, and Dunst’s mother was born in New Jersey, and is of Swedish descent .[5][6]

Until the age of eleven, Dunst lived in Brick Township, New Jersey, where she attended Ranney School.[7] In 1993, her parents separated, and she subsequently moved with her mother and brother to Los Angeles, California, where she attended Laurel Hall School in North Hollywood and Notre Dame High School. In 1995, her mother filed for divorce.[4]

After graduating from Notre Dame in 2000, Dunst continued the acting career that she had begun.[1] As a teenager, she found it difficult to deal with her rising fame, and for a period she blamed her mother for pushing her into acting as a child. However, she later expressed that her mother “always had the best intentions”.[8] When asked if she had any regrets about the way she spent her childhood, Dunst said: “Well, it’s not a natural way to grow up, but it’s the way I grew up and I wouldn’t change it. I have my stuff to work out… I don’t think anybody can sit around and say, ‘My life is more screwed up than yours.’ Everybody has their issues.”[9]

Career[edit]

1988–1993: Early work[edit]

Dunst began her career when she was three years old as a child fashion model in television commercials.[4][10] She was signed with Ford Models and Elite Model Management.[4]

At the age of six, she made her feature film debut in a minor role in Woody Allen‘s short film Oedipus Wrecks that was released as one-third of the anthology film New York Stories (1989). Soon after, she co-starred with Tom Hanks in the comedy-drama The Bonfire of the Vanities (1990), based on Tom Wolfe‘s novel of the same name, where she played the daughter of Hanks’ character.[4] In 1993, Dunst guest-starred on the science fiction drama Star Trek: The Next Generation in the season seven episode titled “Dark Page” as Hedril.[11]

1994–2001: Breakthrough and critical success[edit]

The breakthrough role in Dunst’s career came in 1994 in Interview with the Vampire, based on Anne Rice‘s novel, in which she played Claudia, the child vampire who is a surrogate daughter to Cruise and Pitt’s characters.[12] The film received ambivalent reviews,[13] but many film critics complimented Dunst’s performance. Roger Ebert commented that Dunst’s creation of the child vampire Claudia was one of the “creepier” aspects of the film, and mentioned her ability to convey the impression of great age inside apparent youth.[14]

Todd McCarthy in Variety noted that Dunst was “just right” for the family.[15] The film featured a scene in which Dunst shared her first on-screen kiss with Pitt, who is almost two decades older.[16]

In an interview with Interview magazine, she revealed, while questioned about her kissing scene with Pitt, that kissing him had made her feel uncomfortable: “I thought it was gross, that Brad had cooties. I mean, I was 10.”[17] Her performance earned her the MTV Movie Award for Best Breakthrough Performance, the Saturn Award for Best Young Actress, and her first Golden Globe Award nomination.[1][18][19]

Later in 1994, Dunst co-starred in the drama film Little Women opposite Winona Ryder and Claire Danes.[4] The film received favorable reviews.[20] Critic Janet Maslin of The New York Times wrote that the film was the greatest adaptation of the novel and remarked on Dunst’s performance, “The perfect contrast to take-charge Jo comes from Kirsten Dunst’s scene-stealing Amy, whose vanity and twinkling mischief make so much more sense coming from an 11-year-old vixen than they did from grown-up Joan Bennett in 1933. Ms. Dunst, also scarily effective as the baby bloodsucker of Interview With the Vampire, is a little vamp with a big future.”[21]

In 1995, Dunst co-starred in the fantasy adventure film Jumanji, loosely based on Chris Van Allsburg‘s 1981 book of the same name.[22] The story is about a supernatural and ominous board game which makes animals and other jungle hazards appear upon each roll of the dice.[22] She was part of an ensemble cast that included Robin Williams, Bonnie Hunt and David Alan Grier. The movie grossed $262 million worldwide.[23] That year, and again in 2002, she was named one of People magazine’s 50 Most Beautiful People.[4]

Dunst had a recurring role in season three of the NBC medical drama ER. She played a child prostitute taken under the guidance of the pediatrician Dr. Doug Ross, played by George Clooney.[1] In 1997, she voiced Young Anastasia in the animated musical film Anastasia.[24] Also in 1997, Dunst co-starred in the black comedy film Wag the Dog, opposite Robert De Niro and Dustin Hoffman.[25] The following year she voiced the title character, Kiki, a thirteen-year-old apprentice witch who leaves her home village to spend a year on her own, in the anime movie Kiki’s Delivery Service (1998).[26]

Dunst was offered the role of Angela in the 1999 drama film American Beauty, but turned it down because she did not want to appear in the film’s suggestive sexual scenes or kiss the film’s star Kevin Spacey. She later explained: “When I read it, I was 15 and I don’t think I was mature enough to understand the script’s material.”[17] That same year, she co-starred in the comedy film Dick, opposite Michelle Williams. The film is a parody retelling the events of the Watergate scandal which led to the resignation of U.S. president Richard Nixon.[27]

Dunst was enlisted as an aid in the Savage Garden music video “I Knew I Loved You“, the first single from their 1999 album “Affirmation“. When interviewed by MTV, Darren Hayes of Savage Garden stated that “She’s wonderful. She’s really talented and a great person”.[28]

Dunst co-starred in Sofia Coppola‘s drama film The Virgin Suicides (1999) where she played Lux Lisbon, a troubled teenager.[29] The film was screened as a special presentation at the 43rd San Francisco International Film Festival in 2000.[30] The movie received generally favorable reviews,[31] and San Francisco Chronicle critic Peter Stack noted in his review that Dunst “beautifully balances innocence and wantonness.”[32]

In 2000, Dunst starred in the comedy Bring It On as Torrance Shipman, the captain of a cheerleading squad.[33] The film generated mostly positive reviews,[34] with many critics reserving praise for her performance. In his review, A. O. Scott called her “a terrific comic actress, largely because of her great expressive range, and the nimbleness with which she can shift from anxiety to aggression to genuine hurt.” Charles Taylor of Salon noted that “among contemporary teenage actresses, Dunst has become the sunniest imaginable parodist”, even though he thought the film had failed to provide her with as good a role as she had either in Dick or in The Virgin Suicides.[35] Jessica Winter from The Village Voice complimented Dunst, stating that her performance was “as sprightly and knowingly daft as her turn in Dick” and commenting that “[Dunst] provides the only major element of Bring It On that plays as tweaking parody rather than slick, strident, body-slam churlishness.”[36] Peter Stack of the San Francisco Chronicle, despite giving the film an unfavorable review, commended Dunst for her willingness “to be as silly and cloyingly agreeable as it takes to get through a slapdash film.”[37]

The following year, Dunst starred in the comedy film Get Over It (2001).[38] She later explained that one of the reasons for accepting the role was that it gave her the opportunity to sing.[39] Also in 2001, she starred in the historical drama The Cat’s Meow, directed by Peter Bogdanovich, as the American actress Marion Davies. Derek Elley of Variety described the film as “playful and sporty,” saying that this was Dunst’s best performance to date: “Believable as both a spoiled ingenue and a lover to two very different men, Dunst endows a potentially lightweight character with considerable depth and sympathy.”[40] For her work, she won the Best Actress Silver Ombú category award at the 2002 Mar del Plata International Film Festival.[41]

2002–2009: Spider-Man and mainstream success[edit]

A red-headed woman smiles while wearing a white top with frill detailing.

In 2002, Dunst co-starred opposite Tobey Maguire in the superhero film Spider-Man, the most financially successful film of her career to date. She played Mary Jane Watson, the best friend and love interest of Peter Parker (Maguire). The film was directed by Sam Raimi. Owen Gleiberman of Entertainment Weekly remarked on Dunst’s ability to “lend even the smallest line a tickle of flirtatious music.”[42] In the Los Angeles Times review, critic Kenneth Turan noted that Dunst and Maguire made a real connection on screen, concluding that their relationship “involved audiences to an extent rarely seen in films.”[43] Spider-Man was a commercial and critical success.[44] The movie grossed $114 million during its opening weekend in North America and went on to earn $822 million worldwide.[23]

Following the success of Spider-Man, Dunst co-starred in Ed Solomon‘s drama film Levity (2003).[45] That same year she co-starred opposite Julia Roberts, Maggie Gyllenhaal, and Julia Stiles in the drama film Mona Lisa Smile (2003). The film generated mostly negative reviews,[46] with Manohla Dargis of the Los Angeles Times describing it as “smug and reductive.”[47] She co-starred opposite Jim Carrey, Kate Winslet, and Tom Wilkinson in Michel Gondry‘s science fiction romantic drama Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004) as Mary Svevo.[48] The latter film received very positive reviews,[49] with Entertainment Weekly describing Dunst’s subplot as “nifty and clever”.[50] The movie grossed $72 million worldwide.[23]

The success of the first Spider-Man film led Dunst to reprise her role as Mary Jane Watson in 2004 in Spider-Man 2.[51] The movie was well received by critics[52] and a financial success, setting a new opening weekend box office record for North America.[53] With revenue of $783 million worldwide, it was the second highest-grossing film in 2004.[23] Also in 2004, Dunst co-starred opposite Paul Bettany in the romantic comedy Wimbledon where she portrayed a rising tennis player in the Wimbledon Championships, while Bettany portrayed a fading former tennis star. Reception for the film was mixed,[54] but many critics enjoyed Dunst’s performance.[55][56] Claudia Puig of USA Today reported that the chemistry between Dunst and Bettany was potent, with Dunst doing a fine job as a sassy and self-assured player.[57]

In 2005, she co-starred opposite Orlando Bloom in Cameron Crowe‘s romantic tragicomedy Elizabethtown as Claire Colburn, a flight attendant. The film premiered at the 2005 Toronto International Film Festival. Dunst revealed that working with Crowe was enjoyable, but more demanding than she had expected.[9] The movie garnered mixed reviews,[58] with the Chicago Tribune rating it one out of four stars and describing Dunst’s portrayal of a flight attendant as “cloying.”[59] It was a box office disappointment.[60]

In 2006, Dunst collaborated with Sofia Coppola again and starred as the title character in Coppola’s biographical film Marie Antoinette, adapted from Antonia Fraser‘s book Marie Antoinette: The Journey.[61][62] The movie was screened at a special presentation at the 2006 Cannes Film Festival,[63] and was reviewed favourably.[64] International revenues were $45 million out of $60 million overall.[65]

In 2007, Dunst reprised her role as Mary Jane Watson in Spider-Man 3.[66] In contrast to the previous two films’ positive reviews,[44][52] Spider-Man 3 was met with a mixed reception by critics.[67] Nonetheless, with a total worldwide gross of $891 million, it stands as the most commercially successful film in the series and Dunst’s highest-grossing film to the end of 2008.[23] Having initially signed on for three Spider-Man films, she revealed that she would do a fourth, but only if Raimi and Maguire also returned.[68] In January 2010, it was announced that the fourth film was cancelled and that the Spider-Man film series would be restarted, and therefore dropping Dunst, Maguire, and Raimi from the franchise.[69][70]

In 2008, Dunst co-starred opposite Simon Pegg in the comedy film How to Lose Friends & Alienate People,[71] an adaptation of the memoir of the same name by former Vanity Fair contributing editor Toby Young.[72]

2010–present: Recent film and television work[edit]

Dunst made her screenwriting and directorial debut with the short film Bastard which premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival in 2010,[73] and was later featured at the 2010 Cannes Film Festival.[74] She co-starred opposite Ryan Gosling in the mystery drama All Good Things (2010), based on a true story as the wife of Gosling’s character from a run-down neighborhood who goes missing.[75] The feature received reasonable reviews,[76] and earned $640,000 worldwide.[23] Dunst co-starred with Brian Geraghty in Carlos Cuarón‘s short film The Second Bakery Attack, an adaptation of Haruki Murakami‘s short story of the same name.[77]

In 2011, Dunst co-starred opposite Charlotte Gainsbourg, Kiefer Sutherland and Charlotte Rampling in Lars von Trier‘s drama film Melancholia as a depressed woman at the end of the world. The film premiered at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival and received positive reviews and Dunst was singled out for praise. Steven Loeb of Southampton Patch wrote, “This film has brought the best out of von Trier, as well as his star. Dunst is so good in this film, playing a character unlike any other she has ever attempted… Even if the film itself were not the incredible work of art that it is, Dunst’s performance alone would be incentive enough to recommend it.”[78]

Sukhdev Sandhu wrote from Cannes in The Daily Telegraph that “Dunst is exceptional, so utterly convincing in the lead role – trouble, serene, a fierce savant – that it feels like a career breakthrough.[79] Dunst won several awards for her performance, including the Best Actress Award at the Cannes Film Festival[80][81] and the Best Actress Award from the U.S. National Society of Film Critics[82]

Dunst has signed to star in Sweet Relief as Marla Ruzicka, a peace activist and U.S. relief worker killed by a suicide bomb in Baghdad.[83][84] She has expressed interest in playing the role of Blondie frontwoman Debbie Harry in Michel Gondry‘s upcoming biographical film about the band.[85][86]

In 2012, Dunst co-starred in Juan Diego Solanas‘ science fiction romantic drama Upside Down opposite Jim Sturgess.[87] She starred in Leslye Headland‘s comedy Bachelorette, produced by Will Ferrell and Adam McKay.[88] In 2012, she co-starred in the drama film On the Road as Camille Moriarty, based on Jack Kerouac‘s novel of the same name.[89] She made a cameo appearance in the short feature Fight For Your Right Revisited. It premiered at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival.[90]

In 2016, Dunst starred in Jeff Nichols‘ science fiction drama Midnight Special, with Michael Shannon and Joel Edgerton.[91][92] In May 2015, it was announced that Dunst would star in the Rodarte label founders’ feature directorial debut, Woodshock. The film follows a woman who falls deeper into paranoia after taking a deadly drug.[93][94][95] In 2015, Dunst played Peggy Blumquist in the second season of the critically acclaimed drama, Fargo, for which she received a Golden Globe nomination.

In October 2015, Dunst said that she is co-writing and set to direct a film adaptation of a novel.[96]

In March 2016, Dunst was cast alongside Nicole Kidman and Elle Fanning in The Beguiled, the Sofia Coppola-directed remake of Clint Eastwood‘s original 1971 film that tells the story of a wounded Union soldier who seeks shelter at an all-girls school deep in Confederate country.[97]

In May 2016, she was a member of the main competition jury of the 2016 Cannes Film Festival.[98] In July 2016, it was announced that Dunst would be making her feature film directorial debut with an adaptation of The Bell Jar with Dakota Fanning in the lead role.[99][100]

Music[edit]

Dunst made her singing debut in the comedy film Get Over It, performing two songs written by Marc Shaiman.[101]

She recorded Henry Creamer and Turner Layton‘s jazz standard “After You’ve Gone” that was used in the end credits of The Cat’s Meow.[68][102] In Spider-Man 3, she sang two songs as Mary Jane Watson, one during a Broadway performance, and one as a singing waitress in a jazz club.[68][103] Dunst revealed that she recorded the songs earlier and later lip-sync to it when filming began.[68] She appeared in the music videos for Savage Garden‘s “I Knew I Loved You“,[104] Beastie Boys‘ “Make Some Noise” and R.E.M.‘s “We All Go Back to Where We Belong[105] and she sang two tracks which were “This Old Machine” and “Summer Day” on Jason Schwartzman‘s 2007 solo album Nighttiming.[106]

In 2007, Dunst stated that she had no plans to follow the steps of other actors who release albums, saying: “Definitely not. No way. It worked when Barbra Streisand was doing it, but now it’s a little cheesy, I think. It works better when singers are in movies.”[8]

Dunst starred as the magical princess Majokko in the Takashi Murakami and McG directed short Akihabara Majokko Princess singing a cover of “Turning Japanese“. This was shown at the “Pop Life” exhibition in London’s Tate Modern museum from October 1, 2009, to January 17, 2010. It shows Dunst prancing around Akihabara, a crowded shopping district in Tokyo, Japan.[107][108][109]

Personal life[edit]

Dunst signing autographs at the Toronto International Film Festival in 2005

Health[edit]

Dunst was treated for depression in early 2008 at the Cirque Lodge treatment center in Utah.[110][110][111]

She explained that she had been feeling low in the six months before her admission.[110] In late March 2008, she checked out of the treatment center and began filming All Good Things. In May 2008, she went public with this information in order to dispel rumors of drug and alcohol abuse, stating that “Now that I’m feeling stronger, I was prepared to say something … Depression is pretty serious and should not be gossiped about”.[112][113]

Citizenship[edit]

Dunst gained German citizenship in 2011 and now holds dual citizenship of Germany and the United States.[114][115][116][117][118]

Political activism[edit]

Dunst supported Democratic candidate John Kerry for the 2004 U.S. presidential election.[119] Four years later, she supported Democrat Barack Obama for the 2008 presidential election.[10][120] Dunst revealed that she supported Obama “from the beginning” of the presidential campaign.[121] In support of this, she directed and narrated a documentary entitled Why Tuesday, explaining the United States tradition of voting on Tuesdays.[121][122] She explained that Tuesday is “not a holiday, and the United States is one of the lowest democratic countries in voter turnout.”[121] She felt it important to “influence people in a positive way” to vote on November 4, 2008.[122]

Charity work[edit]

Dunst works with the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, for which she helped design and promote a necklace whose sales proceeds went to the Foundation.[123] She worked in breast cancer awareness, participating in the Stand Up to Cancer telethon in September 2008 to raise funds for cancer research.[124][125] On December 5, 2009, she participated in the Teletón in Mexico, to raise funds for cancer treatment and children’s rehabilitation.[126]

Relationship[edit]

In 2016, Dunst began dating her Fargo co-star Jesse Plemons.[127] By 2017, the couple became engaged.[128]

Filmography[edit]

Film[edit]

Acting roles in film
Year Title Role Notes
1989 New York Stories Lisa’s Daughter Segment: “Oedipus Wrecks”
Kiki’s Delivery Service Kiki English dub
1990 Bonfire of the Vanities, TheThe Bonfire of the Vanities Campbell McCoy
1991 High Strung Young Girl
1994 Greedy Jolene
Interview with the Vampire Claudia Won – Boston Society of Film Critics Award for Best Supporting Actress
Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Most Promising Actress
MTV Movie Award for Best Breakthrough Performance
Saturn Award for Best Performance by a Younger Actor
YoungStar Award for Best Performance by a Young Actress in a Drama Film
Nominated – Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated – Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture
Little Women Younger Amy March Won – Boston Society of Film Critics Award for Best Supporting Actress
Young Artist Award for Best Performance by a Young Actress Co-Starring in a Motion Picture
The Mystery of the Third Planet Alice Selezneva English dub
1995 Jumanji Judy Shepherd Nominated – Saturn Award for Best Performance by a Younger Actor
Young Artist Award for Best Young Leading Actress – Feature Film
1996 Mother Night Young Resi Noth
1997 Anastasia Young Anastasia Voice role
Wag the Dog Tracy Lime
1998 Kiki’s Delivery Service Kiki English dub
Small Soldiers Christy Fimple Nominated – Young Artist Award for Best Performance in a Feature Film – Leading Young Actress
Strike! Verena von Stefan Also known as All I Wanna Do and The Hairy Bird
Animated Adventures of Tom Sawyer, TheThe Animated Adventures of Tom Sawyer Becky Thatcher Voice role
1999 True Heart Bonnie Filmed in 1997
Drop Dead Gorgeous Amber Atkins Nominated – Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Actress
Virgin Suicides, TheThe Virgin Suicides Lux Lisbon Nominated – Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Actress
YoungStar Award for Best Young Actress/Performance in a Motion Picture Drama
Dick Betsy Jobs Nominated – YoungStar Award for Best Young Actress/Performance in a Motion Picture Comedy
2000 Crow: Salvation, TheThe Crow: Salvation Erin Randall
Luckytown Lidda Doyles
Bring It On Torrance Shipman Nominated – Young Artist Award for Best Performance in a Feature Film – Leading Young Actress
Deeply Silly
2001 Get Over It Kelly Woods Nominated – Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Chemistry
Crazy/Beautiful Nicole Oakley
Cat’s Meow, TheThe Cat’s Meow Marion Davies Mar del Plata Film Festival for Best Actress
Lover’s Prayer Zinaida Also known as All Forgotten
2002 Spider-Man Mary Jane Watson Won – Empire Award for Best Actress
MTV Movie Award for Best Female Performance and Best Kiss
Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Liplock
Nominated – Saturn Award for Best Actress
Kids’ Choice Award for Favorite Movie Actress
2003 Levity Sofia Mellinger
Kaena: The Prophecy Kaena Voice role
Mona Lisa Smile Betty Warren Nominated – Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Villain
2004 Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind Mary Svevo Washington D.C. Area Film Critics Association Award for Best Ensemble
Spider-Man 2 Mary Jane Watson Nominated – Empire Award for Best Actress
People’s Choice Award for Favorite On-Screen Chemistry (with Tobey Maguire)
Wimbledon Lizzie Bradbury
2005 Elizabethtown Claire Colburn
2006 Marie Antoinette Marie Antoinette
2007 Spider-Man 3 Mary Jane Watson Nominated – People’s Choice Award for Favorite On Screen Match-up
Kids’ Choice Award for Favorite Female Movie Star
Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie Liplock
National Movie Award for Best Performance by a Female
2008 How to Lose Friends and Alienate People Alison Olsen
2010 All Good Things Katie Marks (Katherine McCarthy)
The Second Bakery Attack Nat Short film
2011 Fight for Your Right Revisited[129] Metal Chick Short film
Touch of Evil The Siren Short film
Melancholia Justine Won – Cannes Film Festival Award for Best Actress
National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actress
Robert Award for Best Actress[130]
Sant Jordi Award for Best Foreign Actress[131]
Saturn Award for Best Actress
Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress (runner-up)
Nominated – AACTA International Award for Best Actress
Alliance of Women Film Journalists Award for Best Actress
Bodil Award for Best Actress[132]
Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Dallas-Fort Worth Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Denver Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
European Film Award for Best Actress
London Film Critics Circle Award for Actress of the Year
Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
2012 Bachelorette Regan Crawford
On the Road Camille Moriarty
Upside Down Eden
2013 The Bling Ring Herself
Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues El Trousias Maiden of the Clouds Cameo appearance
2014 The Two Faces of January Collette Macfarland
Aspirational Kirsten Dunst Short film
2016 Midnight Special Sarah
Hidden Figures Vivian Mitchell Satellite Award for Best Cast – Motion Picture
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture
2017 Woodshock In post-production
The Beguiled Edwina Dabney In post-production

Other credits[edit]

Year Title Notes
2007 Welcome Director
2010 Bastard Writer and director

Television[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1993 Darkness Before Dawn Sandra Guard (Age 8) Movie
1993 Sisters Kitten Margolis Episodes: “Dear Georgie”, “The Land of the Lost Children”
1993 Star Trek: The Next Generation Hedril Episode: “Dark Page
1996 The Siege at Ruby Ridge Sara Weaver Movie
YoungStar Award for Best Performance by a Young Actress in a Made For TV Movie
1996 Touched by an Angel Amy Ann McCoy Episode: “Into the Light
1996–97 ER Charlie Chiemingo 6 episodes
Nominated – Young Artist Award for Best Performance in a Drama Series – Guest Starring Young Actress
YoungStar Award for Best Performance by a Young Actress in a Drama TV Series
1997 Outer Limits, TheThe Outer Limits Joyce Taylor Episode: “Music of the Spheres
1997 Gun Sondra Episode: “The Hole”
1997 Tower of Terror Anna Petterson Movie
Nominated – Young Artist Award for Best Performance in a TV Movie/Pilot/Mini-Series – Leading Young Actress
1998 Stories from My Childhood Alice / Ivett (voices) 2 episodes
1998 Fifteen and Pregnant Tina Spangler Movie
YoungStar Award for Best Performance by a Young Actress in a Miniseries/Made-for-TV Movie
1999 Devil’s Arithmetic, TheThe Devil’s Arithmetic Hannah Stern Showtime movie
Nominated – Young Artist Award for Best Performance in a TV Movie or Pilot – Leading Young Actress
2002 Saturday Night Live Herself (host) Episode: “Kirsten Dunst/Eminem
2014 Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey Cecilia Payne (voice) Episode: “Sisters of the Sun
2014 Portlandia Kim Episode: “Sharing Finances”
2015 Fargo Peggy Blomquist 10 episodes
Critics’ Choice Television Award for Best Actress in a Movie/Miniseries
Nominated – Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Miniseries or Television Film
Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series or a Movie
Satellite Award for Best Actress – Television Series Drama

Discography[edit]